BRITISH HIGH COMMISSIONER TO NIGERIA GIVES INTERVIEW IN PIDGIN

If you want to learn some Pidgin, Britain’s high commissioner in Nigeria could give you some pointers.

Paul Arkwright told the BBC’s Pidgin service what he enjoyed about being in Nigeria, in Pidgin.

Click to watch video of the interview

Pidgin is spoken by an estimated 75m people in Nigeria, with additional speakers across West and Central Africa.

A pidgin  or pidgin language, is a grammatically simplified means of communication that develops between two or more groups that do not have a language in common: typically, a mixture of simplified languages or a simplified primary language with other languages’ elements included. It is most commonly employed in situations such as trade, or where both groups speak languages different from the language of the country in which they reside (but where there is no common language between the groups). Fundamentally, a pidgin is a simplified means of linguistic communication, as it is constructed impromptu, or by convention, between individuals or groups of people. A pidgin is not the native language of any speech community, but is instead learned as a second language

Nigerian Pidgin is an English-based pidgin and creole language spoken as a lingua franca across Nigeria.

The language is commonly referred to as “Pidgin” or Broken (pronounced “Brokin“). It is distinguished from other creole languages since most speakers are not true native speakers although many children learn it at an early age.

 


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